1. 03:10 17th Sep 2014

    Notes: 634

    Reblogged from seananmcguire

    Tags: gifbirdaww

    seananmcguire:

tamorapierce:

endangereduglythings:

"You called?"
I think this is a Griffon Vulture*, which isn’t endangered, but he’s too cute to not reblog.
*Someone please correct me.

I want one…

I want twelve.

    seananmcguire:

    tamorapierce:

    endangereduglythings:

    "You called?"

    I think this is a Griffon Vulture*, which isn’t endangered, but he’s too cute to not reblog.

    *Someone please correct me.

    I want one…

    I want twelve.

    (Source: gifheaven)

     
  2. 03:09

    Notes: 147

    Reblogged from seananmcguire

    Tags: birds

    image: Download

    feathered-friends:

Sunbittern displaying his wings at Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa by KaliNow on Flickr.
     
  3. 02:49

    Notes: 44429

    Reblogged from seananmcguire

    Tags: gifLaverne Cox

    The basis of most arguments against trans people is that we are not who we say we are, that we are always and only the gender that we were assigned at birth. And so much of that is about having a sense of certainty around gender, that when you were born with a certain set of genitalia, then that must dictate your entire life, and the reality is that that’s not trueA lot of people are not comfortable with that, because then that means they have to begin to question who they are.- Laverne Cox

    (Source: sassyhendrix)

     
  4. 02:47

    Notes: 1169

    Reblogged from seananmcguire

    Tags: Myq KaplanComedyGif

    stand-up-comic-gifs:

    Myq Kaplan

     
  5. 02:43

    Notes: 23521

    Reblogged from betterthandarkchocolate

    Tags: DisabilityLovelyMermaids

    mermaids-and-anchors:

Nadya Vessey never actually dreamed of being a mermaid. But then one day, as the lifelong swimmer was taking off her prosthetic legs before an ocean dip near her home in Auckland, New Zealand, a little boy asked why she had no feet. Vessey didn’t explain that she was born with a congenital deformity, or that she lost one leg below the knee when she was 7 and the other at age 16. She told him simply, “I’m a mermaid,” and then slipped into the sea. Inspired by her own little white lie, Vessey decided to write an e-mail to Weta Workshop, the special-effects company that won four Oscars for its work on the Lord of the Rings trilogy. She wanted to know if the artists might consider building her a tail to help her move more gracefully through the water. Cofounder Sir Richard Taylor’s resounding reply: “Yes!” Two years and nearly 800 pro bono hours later, Taylor’s team unveiled a six-foot-long neoprene-and-plastic appendage covered in a Lycra sock that sparkles with digitally printed “scales.” Now, three Kiwi summers later, Vessey says swimming with the tail is finally starting to seem natural—as if it is actually a part of her. Richard Taylor: “The tail looks so simple in photographs, but it was unbelievably complicated and expensive to make. We had to get its buoyancy exactly right for Nadya’s proportions. And we also wanted the tail to look beautiful and feel feminine. We’re pleased with how it came out. Nadya looks very elegant in it. I imagine that for a double amputee, walking might feel a little awkward. But when she gets in the water, she is free.”Nadya Vessey: “Throughout my life, whenever I needed inspiration, I’d go swimming in the ocean. With my tail, I’ve learned to swim in a completely new way. I swim faster, and I use my back muscles more. It takes time to adjust to a prosthetic, of course—it has to become part of your body. There’s a mental shift that occurs. A limb fitter once made me a pair of legs that fit so right they made me feel like a ballerina. Once I’ve fully integrated my tail, I expect I’ll really feel like a water creature! But the tail isn’t just for me; I believe it’s meant to bring others joy.”
Read more: http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Amputee-Nadya-Vessey-Gets-a-Prosthetic-Mermaid-Tail#ixzz2gHvucNBE

    mermaids-and-anchors:

    Nadya Vessey never actually dreamed of being a mermaid. But then one day, as the lifelong swimmer was taking off her prosthetic legs before an ocean dip near her home in Auckland, New Zealand, a little boy asked why she had no feet. Vessey didn’t explain that she was born with a congenital deformity, or that she lost one leg below the knee when she was 7 and the other at age 16. She told him simply, “I’m a mermaid,” and then slipped into the sea.

    Inspired by her own little white lie, Vessey decided to write an e-mail to Weta Workshop, the special-effects company that won four Oscars for its work on the Lord of the Rings trilogy. She wanted to know if the artists might consider building her a tail to help her move more gracefully through the water. Cofounder Sir Richard Taylor’s resounding reply: “Yes!” Two years and nearly 800 pro bono hours later, Taylor’s team unveiled a six-foot-long neoprene-and-plastic appendage covered in a Lycra sock that sparkles with digitally printed “scales.” Now, three Kiwi summers later, Vessey says swimming with the tail is finally starting to seem natural—as if it is actually a part of her.

    Richard Taylor: “The tail looks so simple in photographs, but it was unbelievably complicated and expensive to make. We had to get its buoyancy exactly right for Nadya’s proportions. And we also wanted the tail to look beautiful and feel feminine. We’re pleased with how it came out. Nadya looks very elegant in it. I imagine that for a double amputee, walking might feel a little awkward. But when she gets in the water, she is free.”

    Nadya Vessey: “Throughout my life, whenever I needed inspiration, I’d go swimming in the ocean. With my tail, I’ve learned to swim in a completely new way. I swim faster, and I use my back muscles more. It takes time to adjust to a prosthetic, of course—it has to become part of your body. There’s a mental shift that occurs. A limb fitter once made me a pair of legs that fit so right they made me feel like a ballerina. Once I’ve fully integrated my tail, I expect I’ll really feel like a water creature! But the tail isn’t just for me; I believe it’s meant to bring others joy.”

     
  6. Writing autistic characters who speak through magic non verbally so all they do is sense instead of trying to get words out isn’t actually a stress at all and when lost in the sensory world of a meltdown they actually have company because somebody else is right there speaking sensory language right along with them and communication isn’t a problem even when verbal cues aren’t present. It means non verbal autistic individuals aren’t devalued because their other methods of communication are socially accepted and their personhood is respected.

    Not to mention I have a PoC (Indian) non verbal autistic woman as a loving, caring mother with an important political marriage and another PoC (Indian) verbal autistic third gender individual with a protective instinct a mile wide and they’re important characters who’ll play major parts and neither of them are “the best” at anything and neither of them are particularly magical at figuring things out— one’s trained at figuring things out and she still asks for help on a regular basis, even if she is particularly good at what she does.

    (apothecary-initiate this is the novel I ramble about on and off that you want to read. I found a way to make it better)

     
  7. 02:26

    Notes: 23903

    Reblogged from nebulizard

    Tags: GifLGBTQA

    Wonder Bar, 1934

    (Source: mishawinsexster)

     
  8. 02:15

    Notes: 1209

    Reblogged from psychoticbucky

    Tags: AromanticTrans

    snowflakehealer:

    Shout out to aromantic girls, who have been told since birth the only thing they should want in life is to get married

    Shout out to trans and nonbinary aros, who are dehumanized daily because of their gender and for not experincing romantic attraction

    Shout out to all the aromantics, who live in a world where romance is heavily ingrained into everything around them

    Shout out to all the aros, whose relationships are devalued and viewed as lesser than romantic relationships

    Shout out to all the aros who have to deal with Valentine’s Day every single year, a widely inforced holiday that will never include them

     
  9. 02:09

    Notes: 72049

    Reblogged from mx-autumn

    Tags: GifEating disorders

    wearyourlabel:

    Margaret Cho for Miss Representation (x)

    THIS is so important to share. 

    (Source: maddseline)

     
  10. 02:08

    Notes: 283

    Reblogged from betterthandarkchocolate

    Tags: TattoosIndigenous peoples

    bad-doing:

chin facial tattoos—
educate yourself:

Muun, Daai and Makaan tribeswomen are easily spotted in Mindat and the villages around it. Muun women display a distinctive P-shaped pattern on their cheeks and a Y symbol on their foreheads that mirrors an animist totem carved and planted in their villages. Faithful to their animist traditions, the Muun must celebrate at least one week-long sacrificial ceremony during their lifetimes in order to appease the spirits and secure their place in the afterlife. During that week, they will successively sacrifice a chicken, a goat, a pig, a buffalo and a wild buffalo captured from the wild. They will invite the shaman and fellow villagers to feast on the meat and will collect flat stones from the riverbed to build their own “House of Spirits” at the edge of the village. If this ritual is repeated in the course of any one villager’s lifetime, the observer gains the privilege of building his House of Spirits next to his home.
Though strongly committed to animism, most Muun are simultaneously Christian. One of the more jarring examples of how this mixed religious tradition manifests itself is in the burial practices of the Muun. After the deceased is buried in accordance with Christian tradition, his body will the next day be dug up by friends and cremated, with the bones and ashes laid to rest under the stone stool of his or her House of Spirits. Chin State is perhaps the only place in the world where the cemeteries are empty.
Makaan tribeswomen sport a spotted tattoo pattern forming lines on their forehead and chin while Daai women display a face covered with dots that are mixed with vertical and horizontal lines on the forehead and cheeks.
Ngagah, Daai, Muun, Yin Duu Daai and Uppriu tribes all live in the villages surrounding Kanpetlet.
Yin Duu Daai tattoos consist of vertical lines, including on their eyelids, Uppriu women’s faces are completely covered with dark ink, and Ngagah tattoos are a mix of vertical lines and dots.
Local lore has it that that these tribes first began to ink their faces as a way of disfiguring their beauty and, in doing so, avoid being kidnapped by the Burman king. A second legend states that they were tattooed distinctively to allow for identification with their tribe of origin in the event that they were kidnapped by another tribe. The latter seems more plausible, as the king of Burma made just a single visit to this region, centuries ago. In any case, these women have bravely withstood several hours-long sessions of pain under a citrus thorn used to imbed the ink into their skin.
SOURCE: Irrawaddy

if you want to reblog this woman’s portrait, don’t just leave it. her facial tattoos aren’t just an aesthetic to grace your stupid tumblr, rootless and unattached. they have a history, a purpose, an entire people with hundreds (if not thousands) of years of tradition behind it. we’re not some kind of historical artifact, some quaint reference image, sitting in your flickr account backlog for your next tribal-inspired henna piece. these women are still alive, still practice this, are still struggling to practice this in the face of a government determined to wipe them clean off the map.
i hate that anytime i look through tumblr for pictures of a burmese woman, all i find are padaung women’s neck rings, thanaka and the occasional chin woman with tribal tattoos. and sometimes i’ll find that stupid shepard fairey portrait of aung san suu kyi (fuck you shepard fairey).
also, i have to say, i feel really uneasy with the fact that the tags on this post were just “burmese face tattoo, burmese, burma, tattoo, beauty” because (1) chin tribal people are on the burman government’s shit list and are essentially a stateless people and (2) really? i’m just still mad that you didn’t do any research about who this woman was and why she looks like this. and truthfully, of the 5-6 people who reblogged this before me, of the 5-6 other people who liked this post before me, how many of them knew what they were looking at really?
like, seriously, not-your-asian-fantasy?? yes, i’m calling this probably now-defunct (nah, you reblogged this like last month) blog out. you just reblogged this without any context. tell me that’s not aiding and abetting exotification. i expected more.
i know, what a waste of time to be so upset about this. it’ll pass. but on the off-chance someone’s reading this. do yourself, do me a favor, read a bit more.

    bad-doing:

    chin facial tattoos—

    educate yourself:

    Muun, Daai and Makaan tribeswomen are easily spotted in Mindat and the villages around it. Muun women display a distinctive P-shaped pattern on their cheeks and a Y symbol on their foreheads that mirrors an animist totem carved and planted in their villages. Faithful to their animist traditions, the Muun must celebrate at least one week-long sacrificial ceremony during their lifetimes in order to appease the spirits and secure their place in the afterlife. During that week, they will successively sacrifice a chicken, a goat, a pig, a buffalo and a wild buffalo captured from the wild. They will invite the shaman and fellow villagers to feast on the meat and will collect flat stones from the riverbed to build their own “House of Spirits” at the edge of the village. If this ritual is repeated in the course of any one villager’s lifetime, the observer gains the privilege of building his House of Spirits next to his home.

    Though strongly committed to animism, most Muun are simultaneously Christian. One of the more jarring examples of how this mixed religious tradition manifests itself is in the burial practices of the Muun. After the deceased is buried in accordance with Christian tradition, his body will the next day be dug up by friends and cremated, with the bones and ashes laid to rest under the stone stool of his or her House of Spirits. Chin State is perhaps the only place in the world where the cemeteries are empty.

    Makaan tribeswomen sport a spotted tattoo pattern forming lines on their forehead and chin while Daai women display a face covered with dots that are mixed with vertical and horizontal lines on the forehead and cheeks.

    Ngagah, Daai, Muun, Yin Duu Daai and Uppriu tribes all live in the villages surrounding Kanpetlet.

    Yin Duu Daai tattoos consist of vertical lines, including on their eyelids, Uppriu women’s faces are completely covered with dark ink, and Ngagah tattoos are a mix of vertical lines and dots.

    Local lore has it that that these tribes first began to ink their faces as a way of disfiguring their beauty and, in doing so, avoid being kidnapped by the Burman king. A second legend states that they were tattooed distinctively to allow for identification with their tribe of origin in the event that they were kidnapped by another tribe. The latter seems more plausible, as the king of Burma made just a single visit to this region, centuries ago. In any case, these women have bravely withstood several hours-long sessions of pain under a citrus thorn used to imbed the ink into their skin.

    SOURCE: Irrawaddy

    if you want to reblog this woman’s portrait, don’t just leave it. her facial tattoos aren’t just an aesthetic to grace your stupid tumblr, rootless and unattached. they have a history, a purpose, an entire people with hundreds (if not thousands) of years of tradition behind it. we’re not some kind of historical artifact, some quaint reference image, sitting in your flickr account backlog for your next tribal-inspired henna piece. these women are still alive, still practice this, are still struggling to practice this in the face of a government determined to wipe them clean off the map.

    i hate that anytime i look through tumblr for pictures of a burmese woman, all i find are padaung women’s neck rings, thanaka and the occasional chin woman with tribal tattoos. and sometimes i’ll find that stupid shepard fairey portrait of aung san suu kyi (fuck you shepard fairey).

    also, i have to say, i feel really uneasy with the fact that the tags on this post were just “burmese face tattoo, burmese, burma, tattoo, beauty” because (1) chin tribal people are on the burman government’s shit list and are essentially a stateless people and (2) really? i’m just still mad that you didn’t do any research about who this woman was and why she looks like this. and truthfully, of the 5-6 people who reblogged this before me, of the 5-6 other people who liked this post before me, how many of them knew what they were looking at really?

    like, seriously, not-your-asian-fantasy?? yes, i’m calling this probably now-defunct (nah, you reblogged this like last month) blog out. you just reblogged this without any context. tell me that’s not aiding and abetting exotification. i expected more.

    i know, what a waste of time to be so upset about this. it’ll pass. but on the off-chance someone’s reading this. do yourself, do me a favor, read a bit more.

    (Source: swardz)